Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer—Why we need to be concerned

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is an Invasive Species in Canada that originated in China. It has been found in the Carleton Place and Mississippi Mills areas of our watershed. The areas where it is found are designated “regulated areas” or no move wood zones by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

If you suspect you have Emerald Ash Borer on your property please contact Brian Anderson, MVCA Advisory Services Coordinator 613.253.0006 ext. 228. Brian can identify the EAB and help you manage the damage and protect your healthy trees.

The Eastern Ontario Model Forest has also created a tool kit for municipalities and landowners dealing with EAB eomf.on.ca/eab.

About the EAB

This emerald coloured bug lays eggs in bark of ash tree, the eggs then turn into a borer (worm like) that tunnels under bark and girdles the tree (destroys sap flow by disrupting the bark). There are millions in an infected area.

In the Mississippi watershed there are more ash than elm trees meaning an infestation may be more widespread than the Dutch Elm Disease that devastated the elm population in the area.

  • EAB will kill at least 90% of ash trees in an infected area.
  • EABs spread naturally about a 2 km a year from infected area and widely through movement of ash wood products such as firewood
  • EAB attacks all species of ash trees.  FACT the Mountain Ash is not actually an ash tree
An EAB infestation can:
  1. Destroy Ecosystems (there is black ash in swamps, white ash in upland forests, and green ash in southern farm country)
  2. Lead to shoreline deterioration (ash trees are plentiful along the shore and help stabilize slopes and soil)
  3. Cost municipalities in clean up and replanting (ash trees on municipal land that are dead and dying must be removed for public safety)

 

Other Agencies you can contact:

Eastern Ontario Model Forest
Ontario’s Invading Species Awareness Program
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources

Bonnie Williams (OMNR) took these photos of the EAB
1. Adult
2. Larva Tunneling
3. Tunneling Destruction

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